About Me

This blog is primarily geared toward staff at the zoos, aquariums, museums (ZAMs), and other conservation education organizations that are part of our growing global network. We aim to provide you with cutting edge, challenging, and creative information, ideas, and tools to become as effective as possible at communicating about and for conservation with your visitors and the public.

See our ongoing communications research, or join our growing network, at The Ocean Project's website.

April 30, 2008

Monterey Bay Aquarium Partners with Aramark to Develop Sustainable Seafood Practices to Protect the World's Ocean

Increasing Awareness when Purchasing Sustainable Seafood is an Integral Part of Aramark's Ongoing Commitment to the Environment. A world leader in professional services, Aramark has made a commitment to help preserve the world's oceans and fisheries through a new partnership with Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program.

The Aquarium will help Aramark develop practices to guide the supply, purchase and consumption of sustainable seafood for as many as 180,000 employees in the U.S. and potentially tens of millions of consumers in businesses, universities, schools, sports and entertainment facilities, parks and other locations Aramark operates. Read the details on the Aramark website.

April 29, 2008

The Ocean Project Receives NOAA Grant

The Ocean Project was recently awarded a three-year grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as part of its Environmental Literacy Grants program. The goal of this grant is to significantly increase the effectiveness of our Partners and others in the wider conservation community to bring about real behavior change in their millions of visitors and members. This research project will allow us to better understand how Americans think about the ocean, conservation, and sustainability, and how to better connect with the public to create measurable, lasting change. Essentially, we will learn how our Partner network and the wider conservation community can connect more effectively with the American public in order to build environmental literacy, and create a culture of conservation.

More details in our newsletter from last October.

April 23, 2008

New Environmentally Sound Childrens Clothes

The Ocean Project is proud to support gloucester oneseas as an on-line children`s clothes store for the environmentally-minded. As they say:

"gloucester oneseas is a line of children’s clothing that not only expresses our love for the sea and its creatures, but also supports its conservation."

April 22, 2008

Stichin` Fish - Now That`s a Blog

Happy Earth Day from The Ocean Project!

Check out Stichin` Fish as an example of a well-done community blog with an active goal. Halifax`s Ecology Action Centre is behind using the blogosphere to help the Marine Issues Committee Craft a Gorgeous North Atlantic Seafloor in time for World Ocean Day on June 8th.

April 21, 2008

Why Bother On the Eve of Earth Day

Why Bother?

Over thirty years ago Wendell Berry, the Kentucky farmer and writer, put forward a blunt analysis of us human beings when he argued that the environmental crisis of the 1970s was at its heart a crisis of character and would have to be addressed first at home. He was impatient with people who wrote checks to environmental organizations while thoughtlessly squandering fossil fuel in their everyday lives — the 1970s equivalent of people buying carbon offsets to atone for their Tahoes and Durangos today.

Michael Pollan's thought-provoking article in the New York Times reviews Berry's thinking in the light of the global climate crisis of our era
and let's us know that what each of us does (or doesn't do) really does
matter - quite the appropriate read on the eve of Earth Day.

As always, remember to Seas the Day!

April 3, 2008

New York Times Offers Special Section on Green Business

Mind Your Business

The Sierra Club is embarking on its first product endorsement, putting its logo on Clorox's new Green Works cleaning products. A handful of ambitious businesses are aiming to bypass carbon neutrality and move straight on into carbon negativity. These and more stories popped up in The New York Times' "Business of Green" section last week, which covered the green-biz gamut, from companies trying to manufacture safer chemicals, to financial techniques helping to grow the solar sector, to shareholders unconvinced that going green means making green. Also considered: The rise of green-collar jobs and the growth of academic programs focused at moving students into them.

More logo placement details from the Sierra Club.